GOLF RESEARCH ARCHIVE 2011 - 2022 - Cure To A Slice The Sum Total = Good Golf
The Snap of The Wrists ALEX SMITH TOP OF THE SWING THE DRIVE 1907 ALEX SMITH TOP OF THE DRIVE NOT DISCERNIBLE TO THE EYES

"As the club comes down on the ball, do not allow the left elbow to swing out and away from the body. It must be kept back so as to allow of the "snap of the wrists" at the critical moment when the ball is struck. If the left elbow swings away an instant too soon the hands go through in advance of the club and the result is either a slice or a loss of power." Alex Smith


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2011 - 2022



"My manner of playing is different from either that of Dunn or 'Badminton.' If the right hand be held loosely for the previous part of the swing, it surely must have a firm grip of the club when it strikes the ball. In gripping my club the left hand is partly hidden, the first finger and thumb being firmly locked in the right hand. The thumb of the left hand is kept along the shaft, not round it, and the little finger of the right hand rides the forefinger of the left. In this matter, so far as I know, I stand alone, nor do I venture to advise beginners or, in fact, any one else to copy it." Harry Vardon


HARRY VARDON SAYS:
"THERE IS A KIND OF SUPERSTITION...
SOME PECULIAR KIND OF "SNAP"..."

Download : 'THE WAY TO GOLF' "I have heard it stated on very good authority that when Mr. Balfour first began to play he submitted himself to very much the same process of tuition as that which I am about to advise, and that under the guidance of Tom Dunn" ; "indeed, the position of the body, legs, arms, head, and every other detail is, or ought to be, exactly the same when the ball is being struck as they were when it was addressed" and "Similarly there is a kind of superstition that the elect among drivers get in some peculiar kind of "snap" - a momentary forward pushing movement - with their wrists at the time of impact" and "Generally speaking, the wrists when held firmly will take very good care of themselves ;" Chapter III, Balfour, Mr. A. J., how he learned golf, pages 30; 70; 71. By Harry Vardon THE COMPLETE GOLFER OPEN CHAMPION 1896, 1898, 1899, 1903, AMERICAN CHAMPION, 1900 With Sixty-Six Illustrations Sixth Edition Methuen & Co. 36 Essex Street W.C. London First Published June 1905



"We are frequently told about the wonderful things that can be done by "getting one's wrists into it" at the moment of impact. The greatest of golfers publish this nonsense. Vardon calls it a kind of superstition and says he does not believe in it. It is assuredly unsound and calculated to spoil the drive of anyone trying to use it." P. A. Vaile


Download : "'I've heard so very much about you, Mr. Jones," said Mrs. Zaharias. "I wish you would come to see me one day," said Ernest. "We have much to talk about.'" 'SWING THE CLUBHEAD And Cut Your Golf Score' By Ernest Jones America's Foremost Golf Teacher AND DAVID EISENBERG Illustrated with photographs and drawings HOW THOUSANDS HAVE LEARNED THE SURE WAY TO BETTER GOLF DODD, MEAD AND COMPANY NEW YORK Copyright, 1952, By Ernest Jones and David Eisenberg "The stroke is one single action of swinging the clubhead. You must create a mental pattern of this fact. Any other conception of the stroke - as a series of separate actions to each of which you must give your conscious attention - is impossible to attain... So go to it. SWING THE CLUBHEAD."

Download : 'KTG know the game Golf' Produced in collaboration with the Professional Golfers Association 'Know the Game' Series GOLF Making the Stroke MAKING THE STROKE Page 12 "...hands and arms leading, and then the rest of the downswing is a progressive speeding up of the club-head, which is whipped into the ball in a flail-like manner." Published by EP Publishing Limited 1st Edition 1952 6th Edition (New Rules) 1960 11th Edition 1975 Reprinted 1978 © EP Publishing Ltd., 1976 ISBN 0 7158 0215 1


"It has been said that the power which drives a golf ball is centrifugal force. It is not centrifugal force. A golf club is a lever. The force which drives the levers comes from the right side of the player's body and is delivered to the club thru the player's right hand. A short swing composed chiefly of wrist action produces a snap, while a long swinging arm action produces a sweep. If the wrists be strong, the player can get more distance out of a wrist snap hit than is possible from a long sweeping arm swing. So, make quite sure of getting 100% action out of the wrists." Original Golf Fundamentals, Dunns of Musselburgh, Scotland


Download : "SHOWING POSITION OF RIGHT WRIST FOR PULLED BALL" 'HARRY VARDON BY HIMSELF' GREAT GOLFERS Their Methods At a Glance BY GEORGE W BELDAM WITH CONTRIBUTIONS BY HAROLD H. HILTON J. H. TAYLOR JAMES BRAID ALEX. HERD HARRY VARDON ILLUSTRATED BY 268 ACTION PHOTOGRAPHS London MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED 1904 All rights reserved Page 11 a sliced ball 94-96 PLAYING FOR A SLICE PLAYING FOR A PULL ISLINGTON PUBLIC LIBRARIES



"As a rule, shorten your swing when you fall into a streak of bad golf. It is a common fallacy that the longer the swing, the longer the ball driven by it; and yet experience is constantly teaching us that that is by no means the case. Into the long, loose swing all kinds of golfing heresies may creep quite unnoticed and unfelt; then their deadly work begins and we are undone." Alex Smith


Download : 'Practical Golf' by Walter J. Travis Illustrated From Photographs New & Revised Edition New York And London Harper & Brothers Publishers 1903 III The Long Game "They impart that delightful snap which contributes so materially to length without apparent effort. This wrist movement in itself is not discernible to the eyes of the onlooker... It cannot be illustrated in the ordinary photograph, and, indeed, is very difficult to accurately describe." Page 39-40 From photographs by T. C. Turner Copyright, 1901, by Harper & Brothers All rights reserved May, 1901


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golfswingmisconceptionsmisconception14snapofthewrists INTERNET ARCHIVE The PGQ manual of golf : the professional's way to play better golf by Wiren, Gary Page 362-363 Misconception 14 Snap of the Wrists 1991

"Misconception 14. 'The power source in the golf swing comes from the hands, arms and wrists. We should try to snap our wrists as we come into the impact area.' Reasons: Power in the golf swing comes from leverage (swing arc), torsion (body rotation) and weight shift. In order to achieve these three goals, we must rotate our bodies. The real power in the golf swing is the hips. The faster we move the hips in the downswing, the faster the hands and arms will work. There is no conscious use of the wrists and hands through the impact area. The hands and arms rotate in response to body rotation." The PGA MANUAL OF GOLF 1991


Download : "Vardon gets distance by the tremendous rapidity with which he makes the club travel through the air in the last few feet before the lead reaches the ball, and this he does with his wrists only, which are exceptionally strong. He regularly snaps them, the same as a man does when he plays racquets, and it is this snap of the wrists which enables him to get the tremendous brassey shots for which he is famous." 'VARDON AND HIS IDEAS.' By Charles S. Cox. 1900 April Vol. XXXVI No. 1 p. 88-89 Courtesy LA84 Foundation


"It is not a bad idea to imagine the left hand working back from the target; to visualize the hands, wrists, and arms as scissors. When you come to hit the ball, that left may play various pranks. If it is not strong enough it will give way before the powerful right. The right hand will have nothing to snap over, and a pushed shot with no crispness will result. Or, worse still, the ball will sail away to the right as the left arm buckles up. That left arm has got to be built up to be strong enough to give the right hand sufficient support actually to hit against and so increase its momentum. " R. A. Whitcombe



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